Vivienne Westwood: fashion Style






















Dame Vivienne WestwoodDBERDI(born Vivienne Isabel Swire on 8 April 1941) is a British fashion designer and businesswoman, largely responsible for bringing modern punk and new wavefashions into the mainstream.[1]

Westwood came to public notice when she made clothes for Malcolm McLaren's boutique in the King's Road, which became famous as "SEX". It was their ability to synthesise clothing and music that shaped the 1970s UK punk scene, dominated by McLaren's band, the Sex Pistols. She was deeply inspired by the shock-value of punk—"seeing if one could put a spoke in the system".

Westwood went on to open four shops in London, eventually expanding throughout the United Kingdom and the world, selling an increasingly varied range of merchandise, some of it linked to her many political causes such as the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmamentclimate change and the civil rightsgroup Liberty. She has been twice married, and has two children

When she met Malcolm McLaren, it meant the end of Westwood's marriage to Derek. Westwood and McLaren moved to a council flat in Clapham. Westwood continued to teach until 1971 when McLaren opened a boutique at 430 King's Road called "Let It Rock" (later known variously as "Sex", "Too Fast To Live Too Young To Die", and "Seditionaries") and now Worlds Ends, where Westwood sells her Vivienne Westwood label clothing.

Westwood created clothes which McLaren conceived, drawing inspiration from bikersfetishists and prostitutes.[7]During this period, McLaren became manager of the punk band, the Sex Pistols, and subsequently the two garnered attention as the band wore Westwood's and McLaren's designs. In 1967, while living in Clapham, Westwood and McLaren had a son, Joseph CorrĂ©.[8]

Punk eraEdit

Westwood was one of the architects of the punk fashion phenomenon of the 1970s, saying "I was messianic about punk, seeing if one could put a spoke in the system in some way".[6] The "punk style" included BDSM fashionbondage gear, safety pins, razor blades, bicycle or lavatory chains on clothing and spiked dog collars for jewellery, as well as outrageous make-up and hair. Essential design elements include the adoption of traditional elements of Scottish design such as tartan fabric. Among the more unusual elements of her style is the use of historical 17th- and 18th-century cloth-cutting principles, and reinterpreting these in, for instance, radical cutting lines to men's trousers. Use of these traditional elements make the overall effect of her designs more "shocking".[citation needed]

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Icone: Anna Piaggi





















Piaggi was born in Milan on 22 March 1931.[1] She worked as a translator for an Italian publishing company Mondadori, then wrote for fashion magazines such as the Italian edition of Vogue and, in the 1980s, the avant-garde magazine Vanity. From 1988 she designed double page spreads in the Italian Vogue, where her artistic flair was given free expression in a montage of images and text, with layout by Luca Stoppini.[2]

She used a bright red Olivetti"Valentina" manual typewriter designed by Ettore Sottsass in 1969.[3] Piaggi had a large clothes collection, including 2,865 dresses and 265 pairs of shoes,[citation needed] according to a 2006 exhibition at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. She dressed in an exuberant, unique and eclectic way, never appearing in the same outfit more than once in public.[citation needed]

Piaggi appeared in the documentary Bill Cunningham New York on the New York Times fashion and social photographer Bill Cunningham.[4]

Wikipedia

Ingmari Lamy: fashion model









Ingmari Lamy (born 5 August 1947 in Sweden as Ingmari Johanssen) is a Swedish fashion model who became famous in the late 1960s. She has graced the covers of Vogue as well as Harpers Bazaar. She also was the face of Yves Saint Laurent perfumes for five years during the 1970s and muse to Kenzo.[1]

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